Year: 1950’s
Label: Neumann - Engler
Attached Scarf
Label: Marche
Year: 1960 / 1970
Label: Kokin
Year: 1970 - 1990
Kokin When the unveiling of his fall 1983 Collection, KOKIN emerged as one of the newest forces in international fashion. His millinery mastery was instantly recognized and in subsequent years has been sought after by such industry giants as Oscar De La Renta, Bill Blass, Pauline Trigere, Giorgio Sant Angelo, , Donna Karan, Ralph Lauren, Zac Posen , Catherine Malandrino, newcomer Jade Lai from Creatures Of Comfort, Malia Mills and other 7th Avenue luminaries.
Year: 1950’s
Year: 1950 - 1970
Label: The May Company
Year: 1950 - 1970
Year: 1950’s
Label: Rauschert Soeurs
Year: 1950’s
Label: Sears Roebuck and Co.
I took the pictures with the veil to the back so you can see the hat. The veil should be worn over the hat. We know this is old because the label is Sears Roebuck. They changed the name to just Sears.  The material this is made from was called celluloid.
The material could be celluloid. It was used a lot in the 50’s. This hat has netting on the inside.
Love this hat. The artificial fur is in a light color so you can wear it with almost anything. According to the print inside, the hat was made in Czechoslovakia.
Velvet hat. Not sure of the year but it looks like the 1970’s because Velvet was so cool to have.  The brand is Kokin and he was around before 1983 but his collection, as they say, emerged. The brim is oval, wider than it is from front to back.
Joanie and I just love old movies. So this hat has both of our brains going back in time to what movie did we see this hat. Was it the movie (1957) Designing Women with Gregory Peck and Lauren Bacall? Boy, that movie had a lot of hats.
The British invasion has happened. This hat could have be worn by Judy Carne, Marlo Thomas, Nancy Sinatra about 1962 - 1967. The hat is a woven synthetic material with a white plastic band and bow. The net has some tears on it and the plastic band has a few dark spots. The hat is still a great hat.
This is definitely a designer type hat.  It is asymmetrical and could probably be worn with the large side knot design either on the right or left side.  It’s dark navy blue and in good condition.
Year: 1950’s
Label: Valerie Modes
This is truly a vintage hat.  There are very old silk flowers across the front, and a black velvet bow on the side.  This would be a great accent piece for your vintage style dress.  We found a variety of hats on the web made by this designer, but none have this style.  If you area vintage hat collector and you find one you might want to consider adding this to your collection.
On the internet called: On the trail of Henry Pollak “The first millinery reference I found of Henry Pollak relating to the millinery trade was in a 1916 journal called the Illustrated Milliner.”   This hat is 100% wool and a simple beret style. 
Label: Saks Fifth Ave.
OK this hat is a Saks Fifth Ave. and I have found some in the price range of $35.00 to $60.00 for this type of hat made by Saks. This hat is in very good condition.  The label says it is 100% straw.  Made in Italy.
Year: 1950’s - 1960’s
Label: Christian Dior
Year: 1950’s
Label: Union label only
This hat appears to be made from a crocheted raffia type of material.  The veil netting appears to be in very good condition.  The hat has a union label attached on the inside.
Year: 1950’s
We know the hat is  old but we are sure the flowers are not. We could see that at one time they had something like the flower on it. There were some threads on the inside that were holding something on it. So this is still a cute little black hat.
NOT vintage -- This hat is covered with velvet, flowers and feathers.  It has a nice wide brim and would be really cute with a lot of different outfits.  Let your mind run wild with what to use it for.
Theatrical hat NOT vintage
Year: 1950’s
Label: Neumann - Engler
This hat has the name of the maker and union label. The top inside ribbon band is a little loose and can be fixed with fabric glue.  The entire hat is felt, with grosgrain ribbon accents and is in reasonably good condition.
How to buy Vintage Hats
Vintage:  For Sale Hats
Year: 1950’s
Label: Henry Pollak
We have looked at a lot of hats over the years and it has only been in the last few years we are seeing people wearing hats again. Some are new and some are very old. People are coming back to the old. Most hats do not have a hat label. Sometimes you can just know that the hat is vintage by the style or the materials from which it is made. We watch a lot of old movie and you can see the style change with each movie year or the best reference is TV shows from the early 50’s. We have seen Father Knows Best over and over. You can see the girls in hats and check out the purses also. The lady of the house would never leave without her gloves, purse and hat.                                                                                      
How labels are attached: Let’s talk about how labels can be attached. With the Victorian hats the label is stitched and sometimes printed on the hat lining.  Some have used ribbon with stitching and attached that to the hat.  About the late 1920’s it started be more common to use ribbon stitched with the company or name of a style on the hat and the ribbon in turn was stitched into the hat.  More recently manufacturers began to attach the label very quickly using glue. At times, you may find a hat with two labels, one designating the designer/manufacturer and another stating the store or ladies shop in which it was sold.  The store could order that hats with their label attached by the manufacturer, or they could attach their label once the hats arrived at the store. Manufacturer labels: Let’s look at some of the labels from the past. Chapeaux, Noreen, Louis, Valerie Modes, Gene Doris, Eva Mae, Belmar, Lilly Dache, Sally Viclor, La Demiere. Some have names of  people that made them and stores that sold them. Like Sears, or Macy You can have a famous label but the manufacture may not be the greatest. So the design is wonderful but getting the hat made at a low cost for resale will put the hat in a lower quality rating. When the government from this country and others started controlling who had the license to make the hat, Some manufacturers and retailers would pay to get the license to make or sell the hat so it would have the designers name on it,. like Christian Dior or Miss Hattie Carnegie.  The designer or one of their assistants may have had a hand in the original design, but the manufacturing rights were sold to the licensee who sold them on the broader market. Hat body: Hats are often made using a hat “body” or blank from a manufacturer, and then the details like feathers, ribbons, and even cloth, netting and flowers are attached by the designer.  The manufacturer of the body of the hat often stamps their label on the hat blank, which often isn’t seen unless the hat is completely taken apart to the barest form. Look at the lining. If you see that decorations are on the hat and that it has been sewn through the lining to hold them on, then the decorations are not part of the original hat.
France fashions: France is one country we think of for high fashion and one of  their hats would cost more just because it came from France. The government of  France can regulate certain specific requirements like Haute Couture, French for "high sewing" or "high dressmaking" or "high fashion”.  But this is not so true with other designers for garments. Unusual fabric and sewn with extreme attention to detail and finished by the most experienced and capable sewers, often using time-consuming, hand-executed techniques, Couture translates literally from French as "dressmaking" but may also refer to fashion, sewing, or needlework.  A hat will rarely have a Haute Couture label because the term is so closely regulated by the French government. Size:  What is the size on the label? From about 1930 to 1950 you would see the label on the brim of the hat and most wear about a 21 1/4 to 24 1/4 size hat or today you would just say size 6 3/4 or 7 3/4. A size chart is something to take with you when shopping for a hat.  The size is the circumference of the head band.
DATING HATS: Look for these clues: 1920s Style - Cloche hats.  Characteristics - A close fit, worn with or without decorative elements Pre-1930’s hats will normally have a hand-sewn lining. 1930’s   Style - High crown hats. Characteristics - With a small or wide brim, high crown hats were taller at the center to accommodate curls and worn at an angle to be kind of flirty the interior grosgrain ribbons started about this time. 1930’s-1940’s  Style  - Tilt hats. Characteristics - Small, flat hats worn at an angle, sometimes decorated with flowers  You would see the hat with a size tag. Not all hats have this size designation. A wire loop on the back of the hat to keep it in place and hold it to the head was used. 1941 war years Some fabric and wire supplies were not used. The war came first and you, the consumer, came second. It’s called rationing. 1950’s Style - Close hat or cocktail hat. Platter, cartwheel, pancake, portrait, saucer or lampshade hat. Because of the space race names like flying saucer was used. Mans hats Porkpie or the walking hat. Characteristics - A close-fitting variation of the cloche, this hat was smaller and decorated with beads and feathers. A flat, wide-brimmed hat sometimes with a very low or no crown.  Sometimes the brims were scalloped. Two ‘V’ shape wire clamps on the sides date it to the early- to mid- 1950’s. 1960’s Style – Pillbox, Mod go go, or Half hat.  Characteristics - A small, round hat, with a raised crown, two to three inches in height, and a flat top. It rested atop the head, without a tilt, and it was sometimes veiled. Note: Catholic Church dropped its dress code, abandoning required head coverings for women in 1967. 1970’s Style – Fedora or Trilby.  Characteristics - Representing Hollywood's menswear influence of this era, this style is a replica of the man's hat by the same name and was worn with tailored clothing and feminine accessories
Year: 1940’s
Year: 1950’s
Year: 1950’s
Year: 1960’s
Year: 1960’s
Year: 1950’s
Year: 1950’s
Year: 1950’s
Year: 1950’s
Year: 1960’s
Year: 1960’s
Year: 1940’s
Halo Hat
Funny how things change by TV shows The young girls call this hat an Agent Carter hat.
Raffia material. The hat is call Cloche. Wrapped with vintage ribbon.
Have seen this style of hat on movies from the 1950 and could go into the early 1960’s
This hat is called by two names. Headband or Bandeau
Father Knows Best
The Label: So just what information is included in the label anyway? When fashion was at its peak and women and men wore hats, the company would make sure a label was on the garment so they would have good advertising and people would know for sure the company they bought the garment from.  When it comes to years, take a look at Victorian and Edwardian hats. They don’t have a label most of the time. But in some hats you will see two labels and a stamp. Vintage hats can easily have three parts of its origins: 1. The body mark,  2. the milliner's label, and 3. the seller's label. There are labels for millinery (hat) unions, men’s clothing unions and other unions which made women’s clothing and suiting during the 20th century. These were the unions that helped to not only influence the history of American fashion, but the legalization of fair working conditions for the hundreds of thousands of individuals who worked these factory jobs. Union Label: Most vintage lovers would recognize the International Ladies’ Garment Workers’ Union (ILGWU) label, found in women’s vintage clothing from as early as the 1920s. But there are more union labels to be found in vintage clothing than just that of the ILGWU. The Made in the USA came later as jobs moved overseas. The International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union (ILGWU) was once one of the largest labor unions in the United States, one of the first U.S. unions to have a primarily female membership, and a key player in the labor history of the 1920s and 1930s

Vintage or antique hat?

A hat is generally considered vintage if it can be associated with a specific decade, such as the cloche hats of the 1920’s or the pillbox hats of the 1960’s.  Hats often reflect the social climate of the nation at the time.  For instance, the pillbox hats were associated with the formal style of the 1960’s, while the more military-looking hats of the 1940’s reflected the military feeling of the country during World War II.  The designation of “antique” generally applies to any item over 100 years old.  Antique hats show some history with their specific fabrics, decorations, flowers, feathers or lack of decorations.  The size and shape often hint to the era in which the hat was worn.  For instance, a very large hat with a high fabric crown and wide brim which includes large feather plumes is usually associated with the late 1800’s to very early 1900’s.  In some instances, a particular designer had a very unique look to their hats and the hats are associated with a certain decade in which they were designing.
Why it’s also vintage: Zip codes weren’t invented until 1963, when the growth of America made it necessary to institute zip codes for the postal service to more easily track addresses. So when you look at a label if no zip code is with the address it’s before 1963 most of the time. LOOK FOR … a boutique’s address with the absence of a zip code.
How to buy a Vintage Hats
How to buy a Vintage Hats
.
 
We have looked at a lot of hats over the years and it has only been in the last few years we are seeing people wearing hats again. Some are new and some are very old. People are coming back to the old. Most hats do not have a hat label. Sometimes you can just know that the hat is vintage by the style or the materials from which it is made. We watch a lot of old movie and you can see the style change with each movie year or the best reference is TV shows from the early 50’s. We have seen Father Knows Best over and over. You can see the girls in hats and check out the purses also. The lady of the house would never leave without her gloves, purse and hat.                                                                                      
The Label: So just what information is included in the label anyway? When fashion was at its peak and women and men wore hats, the company would make sure a label was on the garment so they would have good advertising and people would know for sure the company they bought the garment from.  When it comes to years, take a look at Victorian and Edwardian hats. They don’t have a label most of the time. But in some hats you will see two labels and a stamp. Vintage hats can easily have three parts of its origins: 1. The body mark,  2. the milliner's label, and 3. the seller's label. There are labels for millinery (hat) unions, men’s clothing unions and other unions which made women’s clothing and suiting during the 20th century. These were the unions that helped to not only influence the history of American fashion, but the legalization of fair working conditions for the hundreds of thousands of individuals who worked these factory jobs. Union Label: Most vintage lovers would recognize the International Ladies’ Garment Workers’ Union (ILGWU) label, found in women’s vintage clothing from as early as the 1920s. But there are more union labels to be found in vintage clothing than just that of the ILGWU. The Made in the USA came later as jobs moved overseas. The International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union (ILGWU) was once one of the largest labor unions in the United States, one of the first U.S. unions to have a primarily female membership, and a key player in the labor history of the 1920s and 1930s
How labels are attached: Let’s talk about how labels can be attached. With the Victorian hats the label is stitched and sometimes printed on the hat lining.  Some have used ribbon with stitching and attached that to the hat.  About the late 1920’s it started be more common to use ribbon stitched with the company or name of a style on the hat and the ribbon in turn was stitched into the hat.  More recently manufacturers began to attach the label very quickly using glue. At times, you may find a hat with two labels, one designating the designer/manufacturer and another stating the store or ladies shop in which it was sold.  The store could order that hats with their label attached by the manufacturer, or they could attach their label once the hats arrived at the store. Manufacturer labels: Let’s look at some of the labels from the past. Chapeaux, Noreen, Louis, Valerie Modes, Gene Doris, Eva Mae, Belmar, Lilly Dache, Sally Viclor, La Demiere. Some have names of  people that made them and stores that sold them. Like Sears, or Macy You can have a famous label but the manufacture may not be the greatest. So the design is wonderful but getting the hat made at a low cost for resale will put the hat in a lower quality rating. When the government from this country and others started controlling who had the license to make the hat, Some manufacturers and retailers would pay to get the license to make or sell the hat so it would have the designers name on it,. like Christian Dior or Miss Hattie Carnegie.  The designer or one of their assistants may have had a hand in the original design, but the manufacturing rights were sold to the licensee who sold them on the broader market. Hat body: Hats are often made using a hat “body” or blank from a manufacturer, and then the details like feathers, ribbons, and even cloth, netting and flowers are attached by the designer.  The manufacturer of the body of the hat often stamps their label on the hat blank, which often isn’t seen unless the hat is completely taken apart to the barest form. Look at the lining. If you see that decorations are on the hat and that it has been sewn through the lining to hold them on, then the decorations are not part of the original hat.
France fashions: France is one country we think of for high fashion and one of  their hats would cost more just because it came from France. The government of  France can regulate certain specific requirements like Haute Couture, French for "high sewing" or "high dressmaking" or "high fashion”.  But this is not so true with other designers for garments. Unusual fabric and sewn with extreme attention to detail and finished by the most experienced and capable sewers, often using time- consuming, hand-executed techniques, Couture translates literally from French as "dressmaking" but may also refer to fashion, sewing, or needlework.  A hat will rarely have a Haute Couture label because the term is so closely regulated by the French government. Size:  What is the size on the label? From about 1930 to 1950 you would see the label on the brim of the hat and most wear about a 21 1/4 to 24 1/4 size hat or today you would just say size 6 3/4 or 7 3/4. A size chart is something to take with you when shopping for a hat.  The size is the circumference of the head band.
DATING HATS: Look for these clues: 1920s Style - Cloche hats.  Characteristics - A close fit, worn with or without decorative elements Pre-1930’s hats will normally have a hand-sewn lining. 1930’s   Style - High crown hats. Characteristics - With a small or wide brim, high crown hats were taller at the center to accommodate curls and worn at an angle to be kind of flirty the interior grosgrain ribbons started about this time. 1930’s-1940’s  Style  - Tilt hats. Characteristics - Small, flat hats worn at an angle, sometimes decorated with flowers  You would see the hat with a size tag. Not all hats have this size designation. A wire loop on the back of the hat to keep it in place and hold it to the head was used. 1941 war years Some fabric and wire supplies were not used. The war came first and you, the consumer, came second. It’s called rationing. 1950’s Style - Close hat or cocktail hat. Platter, cartwheel, pancake, portrait, saucer or lampshade hat. Because of the space race names like flying saucer was used. Mans hats Porkpie or the walking hat. Characteristics - A close-fitting variation of the cloche, this hat was smaller and decorated with beads and feathers. A flat, wide-brimmed hat sometimes with a very low or no crown.  Sometimes the brims were scalloped. Two ‘V’ shape wire clamps on the sides date it to the early- to mid- 1950’s. 1960’s Style – Pillbox, Mod go go, or Half hat.  Characteristics - A small, round hat, with a raised crown, two to three inches in height, and a flat top. It rested atop the head, without a tilt, and it was sometimes veiled. Note: Catholic Church dropped its dress code, abandoning required head coverings for women in 1967. 1970’s Style – Fedora or Trilby.  Characteristics - Representing Hollywood's menswear influence of this era, this style is a replica of the man's hat by the same name and was worn with tailored clothing and feminine accessories

Vintage or antique hat?

A hat is generally considered vintage if it can be associated with a specific decade, such as the cloche hats of the 1920’s or the pillbox hats of the 1960’s.  Hats often reflect the social climate of the nation at the time.  For instance, the pillbox hats were associated with the formal style of the 1960’s, while the more military-looking hats of the 1940’s reflected the military feeling of the country during World War II.  The designation of “antique” generally applies to any item over 100 years old.  Antique hats show some history with their specific fabrics, decorations, flowers, feathers or lack of decorations.  The size and shape often hint to the era in which the hat was worn.  For instance, a very large hat with a high fabric crown and wide brim which includes large feather plumes is usually associated with the late 1800’s to very early 1900’s.  In some instances, a particular designer had a very unique look to their hats and the hats are associated with a certain decade in which they were designing.
Why it’s also vintage: Zip codes  weren’t invented until 1963, when the growth of America made it necessary to institute zip codes for the postal service to more easily track addresses. So when you look at a label if no zip code is with the address it’s before 1963 most of the time. LOOK FOR … a boutique’s address with the absence of a zip code.

Father Knows Best

Year: 1950’s
Label: Neumann - Engler
Attached Scarf
Label: Marche
Year: 1960 / 1970
Label: Kokin
Year: 1970 - 1990
Kokin When the unveiling of his fall 1983 Collection, KOKIN emerged as one of the newest forces in international fashion. His millinery mastery was instantly recognized and in subsequent years has been sought after by such industry giants as Oscar De La Renta, Bill Blass, Pauline Trigere, Giorgio Sant Angelo, , Donna Karan, Ralph Lauren, Zac Posen , Catherine Malandrino, newcomer Jade Lai from Creatures Of Comfort, Malia Mills and other 7th Avenue luminaries.
Year: 1950’s
Year: 1950 - 1970
Label: The May Company
Year: 1950 - 1970
Year: 1950’s
Label: Rauschert Soeurs
Year: 1950’s
Label: Sears Roebuck and Co.
I took the pictures with the veil to the back so you can see the hat. The veil should be worn over the hat. We know this is old because the label is Sears Roebuck. They changed the name to just Sears.  The material this is made from was called celluloid.
The material could be celluloid. It was used a lot in the 50’s. This hat has netting on the inside.
Love this hat. The artificial fur is in a light color so you can wear it with almost anything. According to the print inside, the hat was made in Czechoslovakia.
Velvet hat. Not sure of the year but it looks like the 1970’s because Velvet was so cool to have.  The brand is Kokin and he was around before 1983 but his collection, as they say, emerged. The brim is oval, wider than it is from front to back.
Joanie and I just love old movies. So this hat has both of our brains going back in time to what movie did we see this hat. Was it the movie (1957) Designing Women with Gregory Peck and Lauren Bacall? Boy, that movie had a lot of hats.
The British invasion has happened. This hat could have be worn by Judy Carne, Marlo Thomas, Nancy Sinatra about 1962 - 1967. The hat is a woven synthetic material with a white plastic band and bow. The net has some tears on it and the plastic band has a few dark spots. The hat is still a great hat.
This is definitely a designer type hat.  It is asymmetrical and could probably be worn with the large side knot design either on the right or left side.  It’s dark navy blue and in good condition.
Year: 1950’s
Label: Valerie Modes
This is truly a vintage hat.  There are very old silk flowers across the front, and a black velvet bow on the side.  This would be a great accent piece for your vintage style dress.  We found a variety of hats on the web made by this designer, but none have this style.  If you area vintage hat collector and you find one you might want to consider adding this to your collection.
On the internet called: On the trail of Henry Pollak “The first millinery reference I found of Henry Pollak relating to the millinery trade was in a 1916 journal called the Illustrated Milliner.”   This hat is 100% wool and a simple beret style. 
Label: Saks Fifth Ave.
OK this hat is a Saks Fifth Ave. and I have found some in the price range of $35.00 to $60.00 for this type of hat made by Saks. This hat is in very good condition.  The label says it is 100% straw.  Made in Italy.
Year: 1950’s - 1960’s
Label: Christian Dior
Year: 1950’s
Label: Union label only
This hat appears to be made from a crocheted raffia type of material.  The veil netting appears to be in very good condition.  The hat has a union label attached on the inside.
Year: 1950’s
We know the hat is  old but we are sure the flowers are not. We could see that at one time they had something like the flower on it. There were some threads on the inside that were holding something on it. So this is still a cute little black hat.
NOT vintage -- This hat is covered with velvet, flowers and feathers.  It has a nice wide brim and would be really cute with a lot of different outfits.  Let your mind run wild with what to use it for.
Theatrical hat NOT vintage
Year: 1950’s
Label: Neumann - Engler
This hat has the name of the maker and union label. The top inside ribbon band is a little loose and can be fixed with fabric glue.  The entire hat is felt, with grosgrain ribbon accents and is in reasonably good condition.
Year: 1950’s
Label: Henry Pollak
Year: 1940’s
Year: 1950’s
Year: 1950’s
Year: 1960’s
Halo Hat
Year: 1960’s
Funny how things change by TV shows The young girls call this hat an Agent Carter hat.
Year: 1950’s
This hat is called by two names. Headband or Bandeau
Year: 1950’s
Year: 1950’s
Raffia material. The hat is call Cloche. Wrapped with vintage ribbon.
Year: 1950’s
Have seen this style of hat on movies from the 1950 and could go into the early 1960’s
Year: 1960’s
Year: 1960’s
Year: 1940’s