CinderellaCastle
© vintagedapperday.com 2015 to Present
Cinderella’s Castle was completed in July 1971, after about 18 months of construction. The castle is 183 feet (56 m) tall, as measured from water-level. Most sources quote the height as six feet taller when measuring from the concrete bottom of the moat, which itself is 6 feet (1.8 m) deep at the bridge. Cinderella’s Castle is more than 100 feet (30 m) taller than the Sleeping Beauty Castle at Disneyland in Anaheim, California. A set-building trick known as forced perspective makes the castle appear larger than it is. At higher elevations, its proportions to full scale are reduced for elements such as stones, windows, and doors. This castle was the largest Disney theme park castle until the completion of the Enchanted Storybook Castle in Shanghai Disneyland Park. Cinderella’s Castle is designed to reflect the late-Gothic, flamboyant style of the 1400s. Unlike Disneyland's castle, no gold is used on the exterior; all gold colors are anodized aluminum. Despite its appearance, no bricks were used in its construction; the inner structure consists of six hundred tons of steel-braced frame construction, with a 10-inch-thick (250 mm) reinforced concrete wall encircling the structure to the full height of the outermost stone-like walls. All of the steel and concrete works are supported on a concrete drilled caisson foundation. Much less fiberglass is used than is popularly believed. Rather, most of the exterior is a thick, very hard fiber-reinforced gypsum plaster that is supported by light-gauge metal studs. Most fiberglass work is reserved for the exterior walls of more ornate upper towers. The roofs are not fiberglass, either. They are shingled in the same type of plastic that computer monitor shells are made from, attached to a cone of light gauge steel sheeting over the steel sub-frame. These towers were lifted by crane, then welded and bolted permanently to the main structure. Contrary to a popular legend, the castle cannot be taken apart or moved in any way in the event of a hurricane. It would take months to disassemble, it would be too dangerous to operate the 300-foot (91 m) crane required in windy conditions, and there would have to be a more structurally sound building to keep it in. As with every other building at Walt Disney World, it was simply efficient enough in design to handle a hurricane. It can easily withstand the 125 mph (200 km/h) wind speeds in Central Florida.
Cinderella’s Castle in the Magic Kingdom at Walt Disney World was inspired by a variety of real and fictional palaces. These included Fontainebleau, Versailles and the châteaux of Chenonceau, Pierrefonds, Chambord, Chaumont and most obviously the Castle Neuschwanstein, Bavaria.  The chief designer of the castle, Herbert Ryman, also referenced the original design for the castle in the film Cinderella and his own well-known creation — the Sleeping Beauty Castle at Disneyland in California. Ray and Joanie have been to Neuschwastein twice. Neuschwanstein is not old. It was started in 1869. Neuschwanstein Castle - English: “New Swanstone” Southern Bavarian: The palace was commissioned by Ludwig II of Bavaria as a retreat and in honor of composer Richard Wagner. Ludwig paid for the palace out of his personal fortune and by means of extensive borrowing, rather than Bavarian public funds. The building design was drafted by the stage designer Christian Jank in 1869 and realized by the architect Eduard Riedel.
Fontainebleau
Chenonceau
Pierrefonds
Neuschwanstein, Bavaria
Christian Jank 1869 designer
Cinderella’s Castle is obviously the most photographed building in the Magic Kingdom and provides beautiful pictures from every side.  It becomes the background for any number of pictures, including those of family groups, vacation shots and of course the fireworks at night.  Many couples have used the castle as the backdrop for their wedding proposal as well.  The interior of the castle entrance is lined with ornate mosaics on the walls and high archways that resemble limestone or marble.
Ray and Joanie were privileged to receive an invitation for annual passholders to look tour the private sleeping quarters in the upper interior of the castle.  For years it was believed that there had been a private quarters built in the top of the castle for Walt Disney to occupy when he was in the park.  According to those who worked on the castle suite, the suite was never finished. Walt Disney died years before the park opened.  The Cinderella’s restaurant has always occupied a spot on one of the upper levels of the castle, but the part that is now the suite had been used for many years as a storage and break room area only.  In 2009, as a part of the Year of a Million Dreams theme for Walt Disney World, it was decided that the castle storage area should become a suite to be used as one of the prizes given away daily.  A family was chosen at the beginning of the day and given the “royal treatment”, ending the day with a stay in the Cinderella suite.  Guests were escorted into a private doorway which led to a private elevator to the suite.  The only access or exit was provided by a special cast member.
As you can imagine, because the suite is exclusive and one-of-a-kind, it is elaborate and lavishly decorated in the manor befitting the castle.  The entrance to the elevator is a small room with classic tables and tapestries and a clock that, of course, always shows midnight.  The walls are done in what looks to be fine sculpted marble and there is a subtle lighting to illuminate the area.
Once you exit the elevator, you are in a small foyer before being led into the actual suite.  The room contains a beautiful floor mosaic depicting the Cinderella coach.  There is a small cabinet against one wall which contains the glass slipper, Cinderella’s crown and a few other small items reminiscent of the story.  The entrance door to the suite is a large carved door that is a dark brown mahogany color.   A very large chandelier with crystal and brass hung from the ceiling.
The suite consists of two king-sized canopy beds with carved headboards.  There are small night stands beside each bed and a large armoire which provided closet space for your stay.  One  night stand holds an old fashioned telephone for your convenience.  One bed also had a comfortable sized writing desk next to it if you want to write a postcard home, you would have a convenient place to do it.    The canopies are heavy tapestry cloth with large amounts of carved wood making the structure.  Opposite the beds was a large fireplace with what looked to be a painting above it.  This painting actually turned into a television by use of a remote control, so that you could watch tv from the bed.  Adjacent to the sleeping quarters is the bathroom.  There were double hammered copper sinks, a good sized shower, a private commode area, and a large jetted tub.  The room came with monogrammed towels with the royal insignia on them.  There was a fancy filigree lighting fixture overhead, and sconces on the wall by the sinks. To the other side of the bedroom was another doorway which led to a sapacious sitting room.  The room was very light and had six very large stained glass windows from which you could overlook part of the park below.  The room included a sofa and a couple of overstuffed chairs and another television.  All of the fabrics and appointments in the room were heavy and rich and added to the elegance of the suite.  Tapestries lined most of the vacant spaces on the walls, consistent with what the castle would have had in Cinderella’s time.  The majority of the light came from the large windows and from wall sconces.  The ceilings were all done in ornate mosaics and carvings.
The door to enter the suite is in the hall as you walk through the center of the castle. After you get inside you see the elevator that takes you up to the suite.
The elevator opens into the main foyer. The only windows are in the entertainment center room and are of stained glass.
The TV looked like a painting and then it turns into a TV.
Photo from online to show the full view of the sitting room with a wide angle lens.
The wood carvings are all hand done. Check out the ceilings and how they copied the European look.  As is true of most Disney rooms, the castle suite only sleeps 4 people.
The bathroom has that old European look with the copper sinks and the old faucets. You have a make-up table at the end of the room.
Ray held one of the towels with the big C monogram for Cinderella on it. He said he had to get one picture with something from the suite.
The foyer contained an Italian-stylized table with an ice bucket and four goblets on a silver tray.  The suite would be ready for the guests’ comfort as soon as they arrived.
In the suite, beside one of the beds was a writing desk.  Disney furnished stationary and writing instruments with which you could write a letter home.  Above the desk was a showcase containing fine porcelain and small paintings consistent with the decor of the room
The ceiling of the sitting room had wooden detail, and was hand painted with designs in the panels between the wood.
There were very elaborate ceiling lights in the bathroom, lighting the main part of the room.  There was also a carved wooden header above the commode, draped with heavy fabric to add one more elegant touch to the already elegant room. 
The walls surrounding the jetted tub held mosaics showing the road to the castle and some scenery from the surrounding countryside.  There was also a niche with what looked like stained glass on one wall.
The shower contained a large rain shower head and a hand-held shower head for individual taste.  The fixtures all looked like antique brass and porcelain.
Tapestries pictures from nature and animals as well as a large pumpkin, much like the pumpkin the fairy godmother used to make Cinderella’s coach.
The dark wood walls contain the focal points of very detailed tapestries hinting at some of the scenes from the Cinderella movie.
When the Year of a Million Dreams ended, it had been rumored that the suite would then be used to house guests from the Make A Wish foundation.  We don’t know whether the suite was ever put to use for that purpose.  We know that several millionaires had requested to stay in the suite and would pay whatever Disney wanted, but as far as we know, those requests were all denied.  At this time we do not know if the suite has ever been used after the original year that it was opened.
CinderellaCastle
Made with Xara
© vintagedapperday.com 2015 to Present
Cinderella Castle was completed in July 1971, after about 18 months of construction. The castle is 183 feet (56 m) tall, as measured from water-level. Most sources quote the height as six feet taller when measuring from the concrete bottom of the moat, which itself is 6 feet (1.8 m) deep at the bridge. Cinderella Castle is more than 100 feet (30 m) taller than Sleeping Beauty Castle at Disneyland in Anaheim, California. A set- building trick known as forced perspective makes the castle appear larger than it is. At higher elevations, its proportions to full scale are reduced for elements such as stones, windows, and doors. This castle was the largest Disney theme park castle until the completion of the Enchanted Storybook Castle in Shanghai Disneyland Park. Cinderella Castle is designed to reflect the late-Gothic, flamboyant style of the 1400s. Unlike Disneyland's castle, no gold is used on the exterior; all gold colors are anodized aluminum. Despite its appearance, no bricks were used in its construction; the inner structure consists of six hundred tons of steel-braced frame construction, with a 10-inch-thick (250 mm) reinforced concrete wall encircling the structure to the full height of the outermost stone-like walls. All of the steel and concrete works are supported on a concrete drilled caisson foundation. Much less fiberglass is used than is popularly believed. Rather, most of the exterior is a thick, very hard fiber-reinforced gypsum plaster that is supported by light- gauge metal studs. Most fiberglass work is reserved for the exterior walls of more ornate upper towers. The roofs are not fiberglass, either. They are shingled in the same type of plastic that computer monitor shells are made from, attached to a cone of light gauge steel sheeting over the steel sub-frame. These towers were lifted by crane, then welded and bolted permanently to the main structure. Contrary to a popular legend, the castle cannot be taken apart or moved in any way in the event of a hurricane. It would take months to disassemble, it would be too dangerous to operate the 300-foot (91 m) crane required in windy conditions, and there would have to be a more structurally sound building to keep it in. As with every other building at Walt Disney World, it was simply efficient enough in design to handle a hurricane. It can easily withstand the 125 mph (200 km/h) wind speeds in Central Florida.
Cinderella Castle was inspired by a variety of real and fictional palaces. These included Fontainebleau, Versailles and the châteaux of Chenonceau, Pierrefonds, Chambord, Chaumont and most obviously the Castle Neuschwanstein, Bavaria.  The chief designer of the castle, Herbert Ryman, also referenced the original design for the castle in the film Cinderella and his own well-known creation — the Sleeping Beauty Castle at Disneyland in California. Ray and Joanie have been to Neuschwastein twice. Neuschwanstein is not old. It was started in 1869. Neuschwanstein Castle - English: “New Swanstone” Southern Bavarian: The palace was commissioned by Ludwig II of Bavaria as a retreat and in honour of Richard Wagner. Ludwig paid for the palace out of his personal fortune and by means of extensive borrowing, rather than Bavarian public funds. The building design was drafted by the stage designer Christian Jank in 1869 and realized by the architect Eduard Riedel.
Fontainebleau
Chenonceau
Pierrefonds
Neuschwanstein, Bavaria
Christian Jank 1869 designer
Cinderella’s Castle is obviously the most photographed building in the Magic Kingdom and provides beautiful pictures from every side.  It becomes the background for any number of pictures, including those of family groups, vacation shots and of course the fireworks at night.  Many couples have used the castle as the backdrop for their wedding proposal as well.  The interior of the castle entrance is lined with ornate mosaics on the walls and high archways that resemble limestone or marble.
Ray and Joanie were privileged to receive an invitation for annual passholders to look tour the private sleeping quarters in the upper interior of the castle.  For years it was believed that there had been a private quarters built in the top of the castle for Walt Disney to occupy when he was in the park.  According to those who worked on the castle suite, the suite was never finished. Walt Disney died years before the park opened.  The Cinderella’s restaurant has always occupied a spot on one of the upper levels of the castle, but the part that is now the suite had been used for many years as a storage and break room area only.  In 2009, as a part of the Year of a Million Dreams theme for Walt Disney World, it was decided that the castle storage area should become a suite to be used as one of the prizes given away daily.  A family was chosen at the beginning of the day and given the “royal treatment”, ending the day with a stay in the Cinderella suite.  Guests were escorted into a private doorway which led to a private elevator to the suite.  The only access or exit was provided by a special cast member.
The elevator opens into the main foyer. The only windows are in the entertainment center room and are of stained glass.
The door to enter the suite is in the hall as you walk through the center of the castle. After you get inside you see the elevator that takes you up to the suite.
Tapestries contain pictures from nature and animals as well as a large pumpkin, much like the pumpkin the fairy godmother used to make Cinderella’s coach.
As you can imagine, because the suite is exclusive and one-of-a- kind, it is elaborate and lavishly decorated in the manor befitting the castle.  The entrance to the elevator is a small room with classic tables and tapestries and a clock that, of course, always shows midnight.  The walls are done in what looks to be fine sculpted marble and there is a subtle lighting to illuminate the area.
Once you exit the elevator, you are in a small foyer before being led into the actual suite.  The room contains a beautiful floor mosaic depicting the Cinderella coach.  There is a small cabinet against one wall which contains the glass slipper, Cinderella’s crown and a few other small items reminiscent of the story.  The entrance door to the suite is a large carved door that is a dark brown mahogany color.   A very large chandelier with crystal and brass hung from the ceiling.
The suite consists of two king-sized canopy beds with carved headboards.  There are small night stands beside each bed and a large armoire which provided closet space for your stay.  One  night stand holds an old fashioned telephone for your convenience.  One bed also had a comfortable sized writing desk next to it if you want to write a postcard home, you would have a convenient place to do it.    The canopies are heavy tapestry cloth with large amounts of carved wood making the structure.  Opposite the beds was a large fireplace with what looked to be a painting above it.  This painting actually turned into a television by use of a remote control, so that you could watch tv from the bed.  Adjacent to the sleeping quarters is the bathroom.  There were double hammered copper sinks, a good sized shower, a private commode area, and a large jetted tub.  The room came with monogrammed towels with the royal insignia on them.  There was a fancy filigree lighting fixture overhead, and sconces on the wall by the sinks. To the other side of the bedroom was another doorway which led to a sapacious sitting room.  The room was very light and had six very large stained glass windows from which you could overlook part of the park below.  The room included a sofa and a couple of overstuffed chairs and another television.  All of the fabrics and appointments in the room were heavy and rich and added to the elegance of the suite.  Tapestries lined most of the vacant spaces on the walls, consistent with what the castle would have had in Cinderella’s time.  The majority of the light came from the large windows and from wall sconces.  The ceilings were all done in ornate mosaics and carvings.
When the Year of a Million Dreams ended, it had been rumored that the suite would then be used to house guests from the Make A Wish foundation.  We don’t know whether the suite was ever put to use for that purpose.  We know that several millionaires had requested to stay in the suite and would pay whatever Disney wanted, but as far as we know, those requests were all denied.  At this time we do not know if the suite has ever been used after the original year that it was opened.
The wood carvings are all hand done. Check out the ceilings and how they copied the European look.  As is true of most Disney rooms, the castle suite only sleeps 4 people.
The TV looked like a painting and then it turns into a TV.
Photo from online to show the full view of the sitting room with a wide angle lens.
The ceiling of the sitting room had wooden detail, and was hand painted with designs in the panels between the wood.
The foyer contained an Italian-stylized table with an ice bucket and four goblets on a silver tray.  The suite would be ready for the guests’ comfort as soon as they arrived.
In the suite, beside one of the beds was a writing desk.  Disney furnished stationary and writing instruments with which you could write a letter home.  Above the desk was a showcase containing fine porcelain and small paintings consistent with the decor of the room
There were very elaborate ceiling lights in the bathroom, lighting the main part of the room.  There was also a carved wooden header above the commode, draped with heavy fabric to add one more elegant touch to the already elegant room. 
The bathroom has that old European look with the copper sinks and the old faucets. You have a make-up table at the end of the room.
Ray held one of the towels with the big C monogram for Cinderella on it. He said he had to get one picture with something from the suite.
The walls surrounding the jetted tub held mosaics showing the road to the castle and some scenery from the surrounding countryside.  There was also a niche with what looked like stained glass on one wall.
The shower contained a large rain shower head and a hand-held shower head for individual taste.  The fixtures all looked like antique brass and porcelain.
The dark wood walls contain the focal points of very detailed tapestries hinting at some of the scenes from the Cinderella movie.