© Vintagedapperday.com 2016 to Present
Dapper Day Fall
We have been looking online for a wicker baby buggy (Pram) and the only ones we could find were New York, Iowa, and other states far away. Florida just does not have the right ones or in good condition. So we went to a Steampunk show in Mt. Dora, Florida. Ray walked over to the buggy on the grass and asked the guy how much? The price was low and we could not pass it up. The Steampunk show had booths and other item for sale around the grounds. All the parts were with the buggy and no damage to the wicker. So, we made phone calls and checked online on how to restore the wicker. The fabric was very dirty so we could not save it. But we kept all the things we took off the buggy for someone in the future that might need them. We started by cleaning the wicker with Amway LOC, used a soft brush on the wicker that had paint flaking off in tiny shards like glitter. This type of buggy was made from 1898 to 1940. This style is about 1930. See restoring photo below. A man asked Ray about the buggy at Disney Springs. We had a steampunk event at the Springs. So his wife was due in a month. He asked about how to get one. But the last thing was “Do you think it will fit in my car?” NO. This type of buggy was used when people walked to the local store, park, and church. They did not take it to other places. Car trucks were big in the 1940’s and 1950’s  and the bonnet will come off and on this one the wheels can come off. The wheels have a spring release. But most wheels will not come off. It would still be hard to take it in a car. We have a big van and it fits snugly standing up without the bonnet attached. We’re not sure that it will fit in a newer van.
Label for the manufacturer and model number
As you can see the rust was everywhere. We started with removing the wicker basket from the frame. Ray worked on removing the paint from the metal frame and the paint from the wood spoke wheels. We had plans to paint the metal rims but they look good the way they are. There is a compartment under the body of the bed. It has a silding door and a storage area under the baby. We got a match of the color so the paint would be the same. We did not paint the wicker because it still has paint falling off of it. So we gave it a clear coat. The wheels can come off of the frame with a little spring clip. Nice. The rubber on the wheels is in good condition but very hard to find a replacement.  Joanie worked on the inside. We made a pattern from the pieces we took out. Do not know what kind of wood the frame is, but we bent a lot nails trying to put it back. together.
Runaway buggy!
Buggy selfie
This wicker pram works with all eras of clothing.  Each of the ladies put their own signature spin on the look they wanted.
The look of a terrified newlywed husband.
Petticoats are always appropriate.
Susan is contemplating what to do with the child.
This nickelodean is not rated for children!
Proud grandparents taking the baby out for a stroll.
The day of purchase - pretty rusty, but in good condition.
The wheels before and after.  You can see how much rust had to be sanded off.
There was an old paper label on the frame, but it was too weathered to salvage.  It wasn’t all readable, so we are still researching the actual manufacturer’s name, and the possible date it was made.
© Vintagedapperday.com 2016 to Present
Dapper Day Fall
We have been looking online for a wicker baby buggy (Pram) and the only ones we could find were New York, Iowa, and other states far away. Florida just does not have the right ones or in good condition. So we went to a Steampunk show in Mt. Dora, Florida. Ray walked over to the buggy on the grass and asked the guy how much? The price was low and we could not pass it up. The Steampunk show had booths and other item for sale around the grounds. All the parts were with the buggy and no damage to the wicker. So, we made phone calls and checked online on how to restore the wicker. The fabric was very dirty so we could not save it. But we kept all the things we took off the buggy for someone in the future that might need them. We started by cleaning the wicker with Amway LOC, used a soft brush on the wicker that had paint flaking off in tiny shards like glitter. This type of buggy was made from 1898 to 1940. This style is about 1930. See restoring photo below. A man asked Ray about the buggy at Disney Springs. We had a steampunk event at the Springs. So his wife was due in a month. He asked about how to get one. But the last thing was “Do you think it will fit in my car?” NO. This type of buggy was used when people walked to the local store, park, and church. They did not take it to other places. Car trucks were big in the 1940’s and 1950’s  and the bonnet will come off and on this one the wheels can come off. The wheels have a spring release. But most wheels will not come off. It would still be hard to take it in a car. We have a big van and it fits snugly standing up without the bonnet attached. We’re not sure that it will fit in a newer van.
Label for the manufacturer and model number
As you can see the rust was everywhere. We started with removing the wicker basket from the frame. Ray worked on removing the paint from the metal frame and the paint from the wood spoke wheels. We had plans to paint the metal rims but they look good the way they are. There is a compartment under the body of the bed. It has a silding door and a storage area under the baby. We got a match of the color so the paint would be the same. We did not paint the wicker because it still has paint falling off of it. So we gave it a clear coat. The wheels can come off of the frame with a little spring clip. Nice. The rubber on the wheels is in good condition but very hard to find a replacement.  Joanie worked on the inside. We made a pattern from the pieces we took out. Do not know what kind of wood the frame is, but we bent a lot nails trying to put it back. together.
Runaway buggy!
Buggy selfie
This wicker pram works with all eras of clothing.  Each of the ladies put their own signature spin on the look they wanted.
The look of a terrified newlywed husband.
Petticoats are always appropriate.
Susan is contemplating what to do with the child.
This nickelodean is not rated for children!
Proud grandparents taking the baby out for a stroll.
The day of purchase - pretty rusty, but in good condition.
The wheels before and after.  You can see how much rust had to be sanded off.
There was an old paper label on the frame, but it was too weathered to salvage.  It wasn’t all readable, so we are still researching the actual manufacturer’s name, and the possible date it was made.